Sign Up
Tartan Footprint helps you connect and share with Scottish people in your life.
Posted on February 7, 2013 by | 20 views | comments
A long drive through beautiful countryside from the small highland village of Ardgay leads down to a small church. Croick church is a pretty building not unlike many other Scottish churches, built from a design by the engineer Thomas Telford. There is little to set it apart, these white hurled wal...
Posted on February 7, 2013 by | 9 views | comments
Dundas Castle was built in 1818 by renowned Scottish architect William Burn, situated in South Queensferry this castle is now the stately home of Sir Jack and his wife Lady Lydia Stewart-Clark. The castle's commanding views over the Forth made it an integral part of Scotland’s defence in World ...
Posted on February 7, 2013 by | 11 views | comments
Robert II, King of Scots, called "the Steward", a title that gave the name to the House of Stewart (later spelled "Stuart"). He ruled from 1371 until his death. Robert was the sole son of Walter Stewart, 6th High Steward of Scotland and Marjorie Bruce, daughter of King Robert I of Scotland and his...
Posted on February 7, 2013 by | 4 views | comments
Robert III, King of Scots, the eldest son of King Robert II by his mistress, Elizabeth Mure, became legitimised with the formal marriage of his parents about 1349. In 1367, Robert III married Anabella Drummond, daughter of Sir John Drummond of Stobhall and Mary Montifex. In 1368 his grand-uncle ...
Posted on February 7, 2013 by | 5 views | comments
James I was king in name only. Born on December 10, 1394, the son of Robert III and Annabella Drummond. He had an eventful childhood. In 1402 his elder brother, David, starved to death in prison at Falkland in Fife. Before the death of his father in 1406 the authorities sent James to France for ...
Posted on February 7, 2013 by | 6 views | comments
James II, the son of James I of Scotland and of Joan Beaufort had an elder twin, Alexander Stewart, Duke of Rothesay, who lived long enough to receive a knighthood, but died in infancy. James II gained the nickname "Fiery face" because of a conspicuous vermilion birthmark on his face. James had si...
Posted on February 7, 2013 by | 7 views | comments
James III of Scotland was the son of James II and Mary of Gueldres. James was an unpopular and ineffective monarch owing to an unwillingness to administer justice fairly, a policy of pursuing alliance with the Kingdom of England, and a disastrous relationship with nearly all his extended family. ...
Posted on February 7, 2013 by | 6 views | comments
The son of King James III and Margaret of Denmark, he was probably born in Stirling Castle. When his father was killed at the Battle of Sauchieburn on June 11, 1488 the fifteen-year-old James took the throne and was crowned at Scone, Perthshire on June 24. The rebels who had gathered at Sauchiebur...
Posted on February 7, 2013 by | 8 views | comments
The son of King James IV of Scotland, he was born in 1512, at Linlithgow Palace, West Lothian, and was still an infant when his father was killed at the Battle of Flodden Field on September 9, 1513. He was crowned in the Chapel Royal at Stirling Castle on September 21, 1513. During his childhood,...
Posted on February 7, 2013 by | 7 views | comments
Although the Stuart family had gained the Scottish throne through Marjory (daughter of Robert the Bruce), Mary became Queen only because all male alternatives had been exhausted. Princess Mary Stuart was born at Linlithgow Palace, Linlithgow, West Lothian, Scotland, on December 7 or December 8, 1...
Posted on February 7, 2013 by | 3 views | comments
James VI and I was King of Scots, King of England, and King of Ireland and was the first to style himself King of Great Britain. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567. Then from the 'Union of the Crowns', in England and Ireland as James I, from 24 March 1603 until his death. He was t...
Posted on February 7, 2013 by | 13 views | comments
Robert I, (Roibert a Briuis in mediaeval Gaelic, Raibeart Bruis in modern Scottish Gaelic and Robert de Brus or Robert de Bruys in Norman French), usually known in modern English today as Robert the Bruce, was King of Scotland (1306 – 1329). Although his paternal ancestors were of Scoto-Norman he...